Conwy, Wales – Literary Hotspot

Charlotte Bronte in Wales? Although Wales is better known for Welsh writer Dylan Thomas (“A Child’s Christmas In Wales”), Charlotte Bronte, author of “Jane Eyre,” spent the first night of her honeymoon in Conwy, Wales. Charlotte and her husband, then continued on to Ireland for their honeymoon. Charlotte was dead before they could return to celebrate their first anniversary.

Conwy claims another literary reference from Ellis Peters’s “Chronicles of Brother Cadfael.” The Benedictine crime solver was born in 1080 in Conwy, in North Wales. Cadfael joined the cloister after living a full life as a crusader, and spends his days gardening, creating medicines for the abbey hospital, and solving murders through a series of twenty books. I’ve downloaded the first book- “A Morbid Taste for Bones” to read while I travel through this land of medieval castles and the legends of King Arthur.

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Can You Ever Really Know an Author?

With J. K. Rowling’s latest contribution to crime fiction – The Silkworm – headlining the New York Times Book Review, Adam Kirsch’s essay in “Bookends” in the same section – When We Read Fiction, How Relevant is the Author’s Biography?  questions whether knowing the author’s life (and previous work) affects our reception of new work – is it

 “a mere distraction from what really matters, the work?”

Although he does not cite Rowling, focusing instead on Jane Austen and Shakespeare, the one with a life clearly available for scrutiny, the other not so much, my expectations of a new book by J.K. Rowling are probably higher because of Harry Potter.  And, like Rick Nelson, who faced a jeering audience when he failed to perform their old favorite songs, Rowling’s foray into adult crime has left me wanting to return to wizards and magic. To be fair, I have only read the first in the detective series, and maybe the second is better.

IMG_0348Shakespeare, on the other hand, will always be a favorite, and I agree with Kirsch:

…the unknowability of Shakespeare  is a key ingredient in his greatness… {he} stays one step ahead of  us, always knowing more about life and human nature than we do…”

Soon I will be getting reacquainted with the Bard at the Utah Shakespeare Festival in Cedar City through Twelfth Nigh, Measure for Measure, and Comedy of Errors, and I know my high expectations will be met.  Jane Austen will be there too in an adaptation of Sense and Sensibility.  Maybe we can all have tea together.

 

 

Epistolaries

After finishing The Divorce Papers, a friend noted that she too liked epistolaries – motivating me to find more.  Now on my to-read list:

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  • The Documents in the Case – (Dorothy Sayers crime novel)
  • Herzog (Saul Bellow)
  • The Pull of the Moon (Elizabeth Berg)
  • The Letters (Luanne Rice and Joe Monninger)
  • The Love Letters of Abelard and Heloise

Do you have a favorite epistolary to recommend?

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