Has It Been That Long?

9-year-ribbon-anniversary-vector-illustration_k56953205Nine years ago today I wrote my first post.  A lot has changed since then.  My mother was still alive nine years ago, and I remember seeing the film Avatar with two friends who have since disappeared from my life.  But…a lot is the same:  I am still reading and reviewing.

I wondered what I was thinking as I wrote that first post nine years ago.  Do you remember what you were doing nine years ago today?

Here it is:

Hi Fellow Readers!

Posted on December 23, 2009, 5 p.m.

With Christmas only a few days away, the mall is the last place I want to be – no matter that I still have presents to wrap, cookies to make, and last-minute shopping ads to ignore.  I’m in denial – sure it all will get done – in the meantime, I’m using delay tactic 307 to read.

My latest find is Debra Ginsberg’s The Grift – no, I did not say the gift, if holiday giving is on your mind.  Remember the old movie with Angelica Huston and John Cusak – the Grifters?  otherwise known as scam artists – appropriate for this time of year.

The story revolves around Marina, who starts her life as a fortune-teller/money seeker at a fairly young age, thanks to her mother.  She’s a good scam artist, as in talented, savvy, and not a bad person.  The story follows her from Florida to Southern California, developing her character and her vision along the way, with a cast of characters that fit into the Hollywood clime.

I’m not giving anything away when I tell you that it gets a little hokey about half way through when Marina discovers she really is psychic.  But the author works the magic through the characters, and the story is still satisfying.

So, what are you reading?

 

 

The Library Book

shopping  It seemed appropriate to borrow Susan Orlean’s The Library Book from the library, and her affinity with the institution caught me from the first page.  I too remember walking to the library as a young girl, holding my mother’s hand, and gleefully letting go once inside to enjoy the freedom of roaming the stacks of children’s books.  I too remember checking out so many books; we had to balance those slippery covers carefully as we walked home. If those books had disappeared in a fire, I would have been devastated. The Library Book tells the story of the 1986 fire that damaged or destroyed more than one million books in Los Angeles’ Central Library.

Perhaps the most poignant note in this book had me forgetting I was reading nonfiction:

Orleans says the fire reminded her of the proverb that when a person dies, it’s as if a library has burned to the ground. “A host of memories and stories and anecdotes that we store in our minds disappears when someone dies. It struck me as being a wonderful way of seeing why libraries feel like these big, collective brains — because they have the memories and stories of a whole culture inside them.

Orleans has produced a comprehensive book in her research, documenting what happens behind the scenes in libraries, how the librarians thought about the fire, then morphing into the library today as it adapts to the digital age. She takes the reader inside the stacks, observing and listening to the questions patrons ask and revealing how the library works. When she investigates the life of Harry Peak, the possible perpetrator, she never hopes to solve the mystery of the devastating fire – but you hope she will.

At times, her attempts at solving the mystery of the fire drives the narrative; other times, her observations of librarians and books connect with my curiosity and awe of both.   I read it all carefully and slowly, and it has inspired three resolutions:

  1. To visit the Los Angeles Central Library,
  2. and find its collection of restaurant menus.
  3. To look for the Library’s float in this year’s Rose Bowl Parade.

 

Two Picture Books for All Those “Adults”

The Wall in the Middle of the Book

Jon Agee and Tommie dePaola  probably were not thinking about politicians or government shut downs when they wrote these picture books for children, but maybe they were trying to ingrain some thoughtfulness into children at a young age – hoping it would stick with them into adulthood.

1df8b181803ff459c707c43af70be49d-w204@1xAgee’s The Wall in the Middle of the Book is supposed to protect one side of the book from the other.  The key words are “supposed to.”  A brick wall runs down the spine in the center of book, and the action takes place on both sides. As the “safe” side slowly disintegrates and floods, the knight is forced over to the other side, where he thinks the monsters will eat him.  Surprise – no one eats him and he makes new friends, What a waste of five billion dollars to build the wall. Preconceived notions about things and people, over a boundary or otherwise, are often distinctly wrong.

Unknown  Quiet

Tommie dePaola’s Quiet has a clear message for all adults tired of listening to the news or rushing around trying to perfect the holiday celebrations for all –   “To be quiet and still is a special thing.”  The little girl says, “I can think when I am quiet.”  The little boy says, “I can see when I am still.”

For all those who know the beauty of quiet – pass it on to others.

Books With Red Covers

shopping    Susan Orlean’s The Library Book jumped off the shelf with its bright red cover, making me wonder what other red covered books I could find. No need to wrap a book with a red cover for Christmas – maybe just add a big bow.

Identifying books by their cover is not new.  A shelf in the Farmington Public Library in Massachusetts helps readers find books by the red cover.  Social media lit up with the picture on Twitter in February of librarians in front of a display of red books with the blazing poster – “I Don’t Remember the Title, But the Cover Was Red.”

Here are my picks – based strictly on judging a book by its cover.   What red covers would you add?

Unknown41FreI2Dg7L._AC_US218_51gDI805NlL._AC_US218_  Unknown  519W0nbxbZL._AC_US218_  04549c5c-b323-4625-9802-6be208ef1414    43ca62ca-94c3-428b-9caf-7ce0cff99584    332b9eae-4ce6-4cf3-8e29-83c60d831dfc    07444b39-c9de-432f-b608-6e4a80fe8bb2    1d3613ea-f637-4b41-9ba1-5b21d84d23e1

Amazon, I Give Up

It’s getting harder to avoid Jeff Bezos. I had sworn off buying books, joining Prime, or anything else from Amazon when the pop-eyed titan clashed with Hatchette book publishers. In 2014 The New York Times reported “(Amazon) controls nearly half the book trade, an unprecedented level for one retailer. And the dispute showed it is not afraid to use its power to discourage sales.”

The desire to own the universe has expanded since then to some of my favorites. Amazon is now the force behind the Washington Post, Audible, Goodreads, Whole Foods, Airbandb, and Uber. And “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” is only available on Prime Video. I may not be able to hold out much longer from the persuasion of persistent marketing.

th  Yes, Virginia, I did finally give in and subscribe to Amazon Prime – bingeing on Mrs. Maisel and Jack Ryan. I christened my Whole Foods account today with a sweep of my App, buying many of the tempting (but not needed) Prime Savings items. I laughed at John Kelly’s article in the Washington Post with his stack of unread New Yorkers (he knows me well), and I dowloaded more books on Audible.  I’ve read and enjoyed most of the Goodreads Choice Awards including Moyes’ Still Me and Hannah’s The Great Alone, but I still wonder why most of the prestigious book award winners were not included.  Where were?

  • Pulitzer Prize winner Less by Greer
  • Pen/Faulkner Award winner Improvement by Joan Silber
  • National Book Foundation Award The Friend by Sigrid Nunez
  • Man Booker Prize Winner Milkman by Anna Burns

51qvrvMLUoL._AC_UL200_SR200,200_On a quick search, I found I could, if I wanted to, order wine from Amazon, as well as my favorite Illy coffee, products from Trader Joe’s, and live goldfish – but no puppies…yet.

I hope Jeff Bezos appreciates my contribution to his space race – but I doubt he’s noticed.