Hispanic Heritage Month

HHMO_Theme_2018_WEBToday marks the beginning of Hispanic Heritage Month, reminding me of Latino authors I have enjoyed and others on my list, including Carlos Ruiz Zafon, Isabel Allende and Sandra Cisneros.  Here are a few of my favorite titles:

  1. Isabel Allende’s In the Midst of Winter – click here for my review
  2. Sandra Cisneros’ The House on Mango Street
  3. Carlos Ruiz Zafon’s The Prisoner of Heaven – click her for my review 

 

And On My To-Read Pile:

9780385542722Fruit of the Drunken Tree by Ingrid Rojas Contreras

 

“Set in ’90s Colombia, Fruit of the Drunken Tree examines the terror inflicted on the South American country by Pablo Escobar from two young girls coming of age.”

 

9781474606189The Labyrinth of the Spirits by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

Zafón follows 2012’s The Prisoner of Heaven with the conclusion to his Cemetery of Forgotten Books quartet, a gripping and moving thriller set in Franco’s Spain.”  

What are your favorites?

 

 

 

 

It’s Never Too Late to “Meet Me at the Museum”

1250295165.01._SX142_SY224_SCLZZZZZZZ_  Anne Youngson’s Meet Me at the Museum focuses on second chances in life and love, but shifting gears into this slow-paced epistolary novel fired up my unexpected interest in anthropology and had me looking for more information.  The Tollund man, a perfectly preserved prehistoric man found in the Danish bog, now on display at the Silkeborge Museum in Denmark, is the motivation behind a chain of letters between an unhappy older woman dissatisfied with her life on the farm, and a lonely museum curator who has recently lost his wife.  Tina Hopgood initiates the letters with an inquiry about the Tollund man, and Anders Larson, the museum curator responds,  with a short lecture on the exhibit and an invitation to visit.  

After 40 years as a farm wife, Tina is regretting she never visited the museum but also wonders about other options in her life she never had the chance to consider. Recently widowed Anders works at Denmark’s Silkeborge Museum, which houses Tollund Man, and is finding himself unable to move on after the death of his wife.  Gradually, over eighteen months of writing, their salutations progress from “Dear Mrs. Hopgood” and “Best Wishes” to “My dear Tina” and finally to  “All my love.” 

As the letters become more personal, they disclose their struggles and give each other advice.  Both have grown daughters who are about to make major changes in their lives, and both are wondering if their lives have had any meaning.  Throughout the story, Youngson interjects long descriptions of farm life from Tina and details of the Tollund Man from Anders.  Tina’s letters are filled with the monotony of tending chickens and slaughtering pigs.  She describes picking raspberries, noting that no matter how careful she is, she always finds some she’s missed, comparing her life to a missed row of raspberries. As their letters eventually merge into philosophical observations from both correspondents and the realization of their new-found connection, raspberries become their private reference for second chances, with Anders noting “I feel I have overlooked far too many of the fruits in this life I have.”

“Our letters have meant so much to us because we have both arrived at the same point in our lives. More behind us than ahead of us…Please do not be angry with the circumstances of your life … nothing is so fixed it cannot be altered.”

Youngson may be her own inspiration for the story.  As an Oxfordshire farm wife who always wanted to write a novel, she finally did write this debut novel in her sixties, and is now pursuing a Ph.D.  It’s never too late.

UnknownAs for Tallund Man, here’s what I discovered – click here for more information

 

Other Epistolary Novels I’ve Enjoyed:

  • Daddy Long Legs
  • 84 Charing Place
  • The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society
  • The Divorce Papers
  • Dear Committee Members

Anita Brookner – Today’s Answer To Jane Austen

When I kept seeing the author Anita Brookner on lists of recommended books, I decided it was time I read her. The winner of the Booker Prize for Hotel du Lac, Brookner has been dubbed a modern day Jane Austen. Real Simple magazine recently suggested her 512JZ3NDLrL._SX319_BO1,204,203,200_ her Brief Lives on its list of summer reads, and Rumaan Alam in her article for the New York Times  – In Praise of Anita Brookner  – offered a starter kit for her books:

The Debut The novelist’s first work opens with a brilliant line — “Dr. Weiss, at forty, knew that her life had been ruined by literature.” — and establishes the themes that Brookner would revisit over the years.

5130EEigw6L._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_Hotel du Lac Her best-known work (which received the Booker Prize in something of an upset) is about a romance novelist on holiday in Switzerland.

Look At Me My favorite of Brookner’s books is about a librarian whom no one seems to see, and contains what must be literature’s most depressing office holiday party.

Dolly This story of a young woman and her elderly, quite monstrous aunt surprises by showing how family bonds can endure over the years.

Fraud A woman of a certain age goes missing. This beautiful book isn’t a thriller but a fantasy for anyone who’s dreamed of leaving an unfulfilling reality behind.

So, here I go, immersing myself in a writer. Have you read any of Brookner’s books?

A Short Thought on a Book I Do Not Plan to Read

shopping   I prefer Tom Clancy to James Patterson when I am looking for a thrill through espionage, and I would rather see the movie than read the book – “Hunt for Red October” leading the list.  James Patterson’s prolific turnout leaves me cold, despite the heroic Alex Cross, so my expectations were low for his collaboration with a former President.

But then I saw the tantalizing interview with Bill Clinton exonerating himself from the MeToo movement, and then I read Anthony Lane’s sarcastic take on “Bill Cinton and James Patterson’s Concussive Collaboration” in the New Yorker.  Although the book is a thriller, Lane offers excerpts guaranteed to provoke laughter in the context of his analysis.

Has any of this convinced me to read the Patterson/Clinton book?  No, but I am more determined than ever to read Curtis Sittenfeld’s book imagining how Hillary’s life would have been like if she had not married Bill, planned for publication in 2019.  There’s a thriller worth anticipating.

In the meantime, I am desperately looking for a good book to read – any ideas?

Royal Wedding

UnknownA friend recently reminded me the Americans fought a war to get away from the English Royals, yet many of us were happy to succumb to the pomp and ceremony of the recent royal wedding between an American who gave up her religion, her career, and her country for the love of a Prince – a plot right out of the Hallmark Channel.  Most public commentators were either politely politically correct or effusively complimentary; privately, opinions on the dress, the celebrities attending, and the sermon varied – but everyone loved the Queen.

51kkZEjM6bL._AC_US218_I found Anthony Lane’s “Daily Comment” in the New Yorker this morning, and I  laughed so hard, my fascinator fell off.  After reading “Harry and Meghan Look to the Future, but Some Royals Never Change,” I decided to download his collection of New Yorker essays – Nobody’s Perfect.  Since Lane is a movie critic, the book is full of his irreverent reviews from “Indecent Proposal: to “Pearl Harbor.”  Although he skewers the plots, the actors, and producers – even Julia Roberts and Alfred Hitchcock do not escape – the book is full of honest laughs.  The Queen would approve.